Spatial data have for centuries been interpreted and visualized on analogue maps, which until recently have been the main means of assistance during perception, understanding and orientation of objects and events in space. The appearance and development of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) opened new possibilities of managing spatial data and their characteristics.

Through the development of new products and services, new economic and market branches are also being developed, including new generations of knowledge and experts with new ideas.

Further development of information and communication technologies, development of spatial databases, possibilities of publishing, visualizing and distribution of data through the internet brings with it new demands on spatial data.

Awareness of a need for data to be standardized so that it can be more easily used by users, in order to promote faster and more efficient development of economic regions, and financial savings that can be realized in this process place new demands on spatial data. In order to speed up development in the field of spatial data, Europe has launched the INSPIRE initiative, linking national spatial data infrastructures.

Due to its core value, almost all economic and scientific branches have a need for spatial data, therefore spatial data, their management, exchange and use present one of the basis for the development of society.

For this reason, the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) is defined as a set of technologies, measures, standards, implementation rules, services, human resources and other factors enabling efficient integration, management and maintenance of the sharing of spatial data, which will be an integral part of the Spatial Data Infrastructure.

NSDI gives the basis for discovery, viewing and use of spatial data within government bodies, in the economic, non-commercial and public sectors, the academic community and citizens in general.

The implementation of NSDI’s is a collection of layered processes in society, which are sometimes not all easily considered; but some of them are: construction of the public sector information, new possibilities for development of services/products and markets, change of administrative-management relations and other.

The development of NSDI will have a direct or indirect influence on a number of social relationships; from economic and legal relations to educational relations, influence on social relations and other.

NSDI includes establishing:

  • spatial data sources
  • metadata system
  • network services and technologies
  • implementation rules, agreements on spatial data sharing, exchange, access and use
  • terms of use
  • coordination and monitoring  mechanisms
  • processes and procedures
  • NSDI Geoportal
  • human resources

What’s the vision behind most NSDI’s?

  • make existing spatial data available to all interested users,
  • become a means for development and a goal of the spatial data market,
  • harmonize the policy, technical standards and operational capabilities of the NSDI with valuable principles,
  • become an integral part of the e-Government program,
  • develop a well organized geoinformational community in the sense of open public-private-academic partnership.

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